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20121201
20121231
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SFGTV 133
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English 133
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 133 (some duplicates have been removed)
in the left-hand part of the stage, our former mayor willie brown who is here. [ applause ] all right. now, would you... thank you. so now, i want to introduce the city's park champion and chief and of course he shares our vision for making our parks, better cleaner, safer and more fun. he also loves to be in our parks and loves sports and he loves to play and pretty darn good at a game of ping-pong among other activities let's give a big san francisco welcome to our mayor, mayor ed lee. >> thank you, phil. how about another round of applause for phil. >> i am so happy to join you with the supervisors and sean thank you again for all of those wonderful years that you have served the city thank you very much for being here. to all of the other supervisors, scott weiner and mark ferrel, thank you for your leadership on infrastructure and open space and parks and on supporting families in this city and to the hardest, most effective commission rec and park commission, thank you very much. all of your leadership there. but there is many other people to thank, we have got a lot of things to be
government. and i think we always need to have that conversation about black and brown,mxr'a÷ and race, when we.é about education because i see that the city is taken off as far as -- industry without black and brown youth, and we're putting tags on black and brown children andé+ to prison because a lot of times these funding -- you know we come up with things that we think are going to work, and 2.7 million sounds a lot to some people. my bad. but whatever we come upc4ji' with,1lj÷ if it doesn't work let's just not keep sending the kids straight to jail. it's like we need to come up with more things to do whether it be finding more money or developing a self-supporting mechanism that produces human capital so that manufacturers human capital so that we can given some other type of capital to kids, as far as, you know, human capital, like education. thank you. god bless you all. >> president chiu: thanks. next speakerr@y,. >> i'll be using the overhead. this is my daughter, charlotte molinari. what i'm going to speak
of what we've been able to accomplish in those years. seeing how mayor brown became mayor and my lucky charm of being now the first asian mayor of the city, understanding -- thank you. (applause) >> understanding now that we have the first african-american as president of the united states has now been reelected. [cheering and applauding] >> and this is in addition to all of the local regional lgbt persons that have been elected and a pointed to this wonderful city and the region. * appointed i think they would smile, that they would see that their efforts to make this city much more equitable for everybody has been already accomplished. and like supervisor wiener said, the job isn't done, but there's been a lot that has been done. and we're proud of it and we want to keep it going. and just look at the crowd here today celebrating this. you see how diverse the city is and continues to be, and that we pledge in our own official capacities, we're going to always keep these doors open. we're going to always work to make our diversity benefit the rest of the city for generations and gene
a resolution from supervisor chu. i believe it's -- it has the requisite commendatory finding as well as brown act finding. it's been seconded by supervisor elsbernd. let me ask if there are members of public that wish to speak on this imperative item. seeing none -- you're welcome to speak on the imperative item which is a resolution around -- madam clerk it's the sunset rec center? >> clerk calvillo: yes recognizing the grand reopening of thesq9k4$ópimÑ sunset recre. >> president chiu: so you can speak on this item. life or death, imperative, what is imperative. imperative, i think, is the right for people to live equally, for this to be the land of the free and the home of the brave, in order to do that, we need to be safe. disabled people who have seizures are not::zjr)z the parks or anywhere because we don't have appropriate actions for them as a seizure victim i would like to see that be an imperative --da'( r a detail brt before you because i have the solution. we could take people, who are seizuring, and bring pup tents to them, bring people who are properly trained in the chinese h
a ways to go. there is so much to do but we have accomplished quite a bit. i know former mayor brown, who is not here yet, but he will be dashing in, let him know i said this. if he were the president of the united states we would be the 186th country it ratify cdal i say that because i know he and his history was the very first to sign up our city, it pass the ordinance when he was the mayor, to make sure we were on the road by abiding by those principles and then when i had a chance as director of public works i took up the helm for that department. you know, those years, they were really blue collar attitudes in public works, but we found the women leaders that we could acknowledge and promote and it became an even better agency for that very reason. so i want to again acknowledge that history. we still have a lot to do since our country has yet to ratify these principles. i hope that we will get closer and closer to do that or if not do it now, it is something that i think we've really been embarrassed about as a country not to do this on a national level. but i join you today
that conversation about black and brown,mxr'a÷ and racen about education, because i see that the city is taken off as far as -- industry without black and brown youth, and we're putting tags on black and brown to prison because a lot of times these funding -- you know, we come up with things that we think are going to work, and 2.7 million sounds a lot to some people. my bad. but whatever we come upc4ji' wif it doesn't work let's just not keep sending the kids straight to jail. it's like we need to come up with more things to do, whether it be finding more money, or developing a self-supporting mechanism that produces human capital so that manufacturers human capital so that we can given some other type of capital to kids, as far as, you know, human capital, like education. thank you. god bless you all. >> president chiu: thanks. next speakerr@y,. >> i'll be using the overhead. this is my daughter, charlotte molinari. what i'm going to speak to you about is very sensitive for me and you all as well because it has to do with the abuse of power, from law enforcement to elected3* officials, retired
. brian brown berger. and frank [speaker not understood]. >>> good evening. i'm patricia [speaker not understood]. i live at 70 crestline drive. i'd like to share with you some pictures. actually these are ones that were produced in 1998 and i'm pleased to say that they're so much better [speaker not understood] to generate the open space. so, can this be switched on? oh, here we go, okay. i can manipulate them. they're not very good, but nevertheless what you can see in the area here -- >> you might want to speak into the microphone there. >>> i'm sorry, i can do both of those. that's the space we're talking about where there are the steps where you can see the figure. and to the right would be the place for the new building, which i might add is a very lovely one. and it takes up that amount of space. so, if you look at the bottom picture there, a little closer, i think you'll see it will take up quite a considerable amount of space right to the edge of the public stairway whether maintained well or not is an issue between us and the city. it is an important place for people to
commendatory finding as well as brown act finding. seconded by supervisor campos. is there any public comment on this item? okay. seeing no public comment, public comment is closed. and if we can take this item same house same call. that shall be the case. madam clerk please read the in memoriams. >> the clerk: today's meeting will be adjourned in memory of the following individuals on behalf of supervisor avalos for the late alex -- on behalf of supervisor mar for the late ms. fay hennic bingham, on behalf of president chiu and supervisor mar for the late mr. allen farley. on behalf of supervisor elsbernd for the"j2x late mr. he hadward patrick mcgovern. on behalf of supervisor campos, supervisor mar, supervisor kim and avalos, for the late mr. howard l. wallace. >> president chiu: thank you, madam clerk. is there any more business in front of the body? >> clerk calvillo: that concludes our business for today, mr. president. >> president chiu: i want to wish you and your families, members of the public and everyone watching on sf gov tv, thank you for your service and wishing everyone for a
the machine there or not. i think you should just continue. >> good afternoon, supervisors, mary brown, planning department staff to present the proposed designation for sam jordan's bar as an individual poland lark under article 10 of the planning code. at the request of the land owner the project was added to the land mark work program in 2011. at both the june and july hearing the historic commission voted unanimously in favor of the building based on its historical significance. to summarize, the build is significant for its association with the life of a person significant in our past. it is a physical location and geographic locus of the life work of sam jordan. jordan was a prominent business, political, social and cultural leader in the bayview neighborhood through the middle decades of the 20th century. sam jordan's support of african american entrepreneurship, civil rights and political involvement began before 1958 when he took ownership of the bar and remained constant until his death in 2003. his influence extended far beyond the neighborhood to include the larger sphe
unable to be here to respond, but i do believe that valley brown may be returning to work in district 5 office or at least that's the rumor. if that's the case then hopefully she'll be able to answer some of the questions that might come up today and that will definitely forward to her. also redevelopment agency certainly there's been a lot of really bad history in the western addition over the decades and accountability is something i think people would really like to see, so i am not sure how we necessarily achieve that other than continuing to kind of have to informational hearings and for people to continue to ask questions, which we will then again forward to redevelopment personnel to moewd and to the oversight board. but i believe that before supervisor mercurini left, he did request a audit and we will find out what the status of that is. there were a lot of questions around $800,000 and we will find out about that and make sure member s of the public receive, but we didn't want to leave without having an opportunity for members of the public to put concerns or questions on th
. there was a video done of the physical abuse of the student at the school and apparently amos brown was able to see that video. who allowed him to see that video, since he is not a parent of the student? is this allowed? other people have asked to see the have and not been provided that opportunity. there are serious and systematic problems going on and it has to be addressed. if this is slander, it's absolutely untrue and i think the superintendent should apologize to the people, the parents and students at mlk. thank you. >> good evening everyone. my name was in the paper for -- i will just quote it, "she yelled at me in front of two classes of students," said linda cook a former english teacher who was removed from her job and i will use another [kwo-ets/] [tpra-erlt/], "there are procedures in place to evaluate personnel and we follow these procedures," said school superintendent richard carranza in a statement. slandser is when someone tells a lie about another. it is slander when the lie can damage another's reputation. a group of students wrote a letter about the principal's behavior wh
with a timely manner within the brown act, something that this government seems to circumvent. many, many violations of the sunshine department are routine in this recreation and park department. cultivating the desecration of western culture. that is what is going on within this recreation and park department. if you cannot see either the ramifications or collateral damage this department has achieved, then you are seriously deceiving yourself and the general public. you have caused immense suffering, hardship and devastation to the bay area. city and county of san francisco and all of the people that have lived in it. it is similar to the feeling in benghazi. september 11th, 2012. nobody here to answer your concerns. nobody here that cares. nobody here that is watching what is really going on. thank you for your time. have a great day. and enjoy your thanksgiving. >> thank you. >> is there anyone else? richard, come forward. that is not this one. it is the next one. okay. richard. >> good morning, commissioners and general manager. i would like to speak in support of what's happening on
that we see here who spoke, the mayor and mayor brown, mayor lee, those that have gone on into the state senate and the state assembly, by those that have gone on to the national stage representing not only the lgbt community, but every marginalized community we've had in this country. the chorus that i'll talk about in a minute who got their first public performance on the night that harvey and george were taken from us. but mayor brown called them two extraordinary individuals. actually, mayor brown shared that with me four years ago. it has stayed with me. harvey and george, they put in place, as the mayor said, a foundation of what we see today in equality and justice. we actually live in an extraordinary time because of the shoulders created by george and harvey. we live in an extraordinary moment because each of you believe you're worthy because each of you have a gift of authenticity to offer the world. and each of you are here tonight with not only the moscone and milk family, but the true meaning of the human family, in remembrance of the sacrifices that have taken us to get us
on the budget. for the three mayors i've had the pleasure to work for, mayor brown, mayor newsom and now mayor lee, they make sure that we have the funds that we need to pursue disability access, that is vital. that is from the top. what we get to do as councilmembers, i'm trying to promote people stepping forward to apply as a council member in the future. we get to try to bridge some of the gaps that ms. jacobson herself did today. across the bay. she sees a need, she tries to bridge the gap. sometimes we need to be angry. that's okay. if we come with respect, human respect, we respect the notion of human rights will be okay. it is called the squeaky wheel, as our former director used to set. the squeaky wheel is oiled by law, it will move forward. i started out in the committee. the program access committee. it is no longer in existence. one of our main projects was trying to include disability rights in the -- i'm thinking about it myself -- when you hire a contractor, you have minority rights. i am missing what that is called. we tried to get disability rights in there too. t
on the fire hydrants. fire box red for the fire boxes. our brown for the pg and e poles. >> we are not painters we do our best. >> i'm assuming it has to do with gang activity. >> if it's territorial i mind. >> in case it's gang related and they are marking our territory i would like to paint it over. >> anything with numbers like x iv or x 13 west side mob and the bay view those are gang related. with gang related or profanity we will abait it as soon as possible. >> i consider it an art. there are circles of people that form around it whether or not they should ruin public property. >> this is art work i'm for it. unless it's on someone's property and they don't want it there. judge kids with silver paint expressing their ego needs doesn't belong on our property. >> graffiti is when you don't have permission to write anything on their property. >> eighth street is part of your regular rout? >> yes. >> everyday. >> eighth street. divisidero street. irving street. every block they going through they paint 3 or 4 streets in the block the poles the utility boxes, mailb
Search Results 0 to 49 of about 133 (some duplicates have been removed)